Trevor Colden, 'super-psyched'

Rodent

Trevor Colden and a backside smith in Greensboro.

It's not surprising that 17-year-old Trevor Colden sounds elated when answering our questions. After all, whether it's joining blue chip teams such as Mystery and Emerica or winning the consequential Tampa Am contest, Colden's rise has been meteoritic.

What is somewhat surprising is Colden's humility. Clearly, glory has not gone to his head. The Virginia Beach native comes across as a nice kid who just happens to be one of the best amateur skateboarders in the world.

In this interview the affable adolescent, who now resides in Encinitas, Calif., shares thoughts on his Tampa Am victory, bass fishing, as well as his un-self-conscious love of Tyler Perry films.

ESPN.com: Last year was a fairly epic year for you. You had a well-received welcome video from Mystery. You joined the Emerica team. Then, of course, you won Tampa Am. From the outside it looks like you have achieved every skateboarder's dream. How do you feel about last year?
Colden: I don't know. Everything happened so fast. I am so thankful for it. I am super-psyched for everything that happened and how it happened so quickly. I can't even really describe it.

ESPN.com: Was there any downside?
Colden: There is absolutely no downside. But the only downside to it is, probably, being so far away from my family.

ESPN.com: Could you describe the moment when they announced you'd won Tampa Am?
Colden: I didn't think I was going to win, because everyone was so gnarly. I couldn't even talk. There was champagne sprayed everywhere. It was awesome, dude. That night I went out to dinner with the judges from Tampa. I had this big hotel room all to myself. [My roommate] couldn't make it because he had a meeting. So I was lonely.

ESPN.com: Have any mainstream brands, like Sony or Panasonic, hollered at you because of Tampa?
Colden: No. Nothing like that. No, like, electricity companies. [Laughs]

Mike Blabac

Nollie flip noseslide under crowd pressure.

ESPN.com: How has this past year changed your parents' view of your skating career?
Colden: I don't really talk to my dad. My mom is so proud of me. I can't ever talk to her on the phone without her seriously bawling out crying. She is so supportive. She has always been telling me that she's my biggest fan.

ESPN.com: Three of the biggest names in skateboarding -- Heath Kirchart, Chris Cole and Jamie Thomas -- have become your personal mentors. You must have been nervous when you first skated with them.
Colden: Seriously, I feel super-comfortable with them now. Heath is, seriously, like, older brother, Dad-type material. When I first got on, I didn't want to fall in front of them. Now it's just like skating with a couple of friends.

ESPN.com: From "pros to bros."
Colden: Exactly. Just chilling. Heath Kirchart, he's seriously the nicest and sickest dude I have ever met. Heath is always telling me how to save my money. They're almost like friends. I just pick up the phone, like, "Yo, what's up, man?"

ESPN.com: Having accomplished so much in so short a time, what's it like when you go back to your hometown, Virginia Beach?
Colden: No one really skates anymore. It's pretty lame. I just go there and hang out with a couple of friends. Skate at the local park. I do like fishing. I just skate the park with my friends. Then afterwards I go fishing. I'd go fishing out here in California, but there's no lakes or ponds out here or anything. There's a whole bunch of little rivers and lakes and ponds and stuff in Virginia. Bass. I just catch them and let them go.

ESPN.com: Do your friends back home ask you silly questions like "What's Chris Cole really like? What's Jamie Thomas really like?"
Colden: Yeah, yeah. They always ask me stuff like that. It doesn't really bug me. It kind of does. It's just like -- I don't know. I feel like I want to get treated as if this never happened. They always ask me for free product. If I have it I am always happy to give it to them. If I don't, I feel bad.

ESPN.com: It's been widely reported that potato chips are some of your favorite foods. Have you thought of trying to get a chip sponsor?
Colden: Oh, my God! I would be so psyched if I got a chips sponsor.

Mike Blabac

Frontside blunt.

ESPN.com: Which sponsor would you like?
Colden: Spicy Nacho Doritos.

ESPN.com: Those are nasty.
Colden: What!? No! Those are so good. If I am on a skate trip, I will eat five packs a day. That is all I'll eat.

ESPN.com: You have an interesting heritage. You're part Native American and part Hawaiian. Growing up, what kind of traditions, if any, did your parents teach you from these different cultures? Did they cook any exotic food?
Colden: Not really. I am not sure what Indian I am. I just know that I am. No one ever really broke it down to me.

ESPN.com: I read that one of your favorite foods is Hawaiian bread? What is Hawaiian bread?
Colden: Oh, my God! It's like these Hawaiian rolls that are amazing, so soft and sweet. They're the best!

ESPN.com: You recently tweeted that you like Tyler Perry movies. Was that a joke?
Colden: No, no, no. That dude is hilarious. His sense of humor is awesome.

ESPN.com: This is the film director Tyler Perry?
Colden: He, like, plays, like, three different characters in every movie he's in.

ESPN.com: What's your favorite Tyler Perry movie?
Colden: I don't know. He has so many that are good. I couldn't even tell you.

ESPN.com: What plans do you have for 2012?
Colden: Get my license, get a car, and that's it. And film the Emerica part.

ESPN.com: You're probably going to have to get used to giving interviews. I should ask that in the form of the question. If you continue killing it, you're probably going to have to get used to giving interviews, don't you think?
Colden: Oh, yeah. I don't care. Interviews. I am more than happy to do them.

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